Booklight Productions


Reader’s theatre is an excellent way to experience live theatre.  Similar to a radio play, these productions are minimally staged, often include narration, and encourage a little more imagination.  From an actor’s standpoint, reader’s theatre is a favorite because it allows more flexibility for casting choices and fewer rehearsals. We’re excited to present three shows during our 2018-2019 season that we hope you’ll enjoy:

October 19-21: The Night of January 16th, by Ayn Rand
The audience becomes the jury in this courtroom drama directed by Dan Griffith. Did Karen Andre kill her lover, the financier Bjorn Faulkner, by throwing him from the roof of his New York penthouse? The proper verdict is not dictated by the factual evidence. It rests on which witnesses audience members find credible. As the trial progresses through several unpredictable twists and turns, psychological characteristics come to light that reveal each character’s basic attitude toward life. As Rand puts it, “The events feature the confrontation of two extremes, two opposite ways of facing existence: passionate self-assertiveness, self-confidence, ambition, audacity, independence — versus conventionality, servility, envy, hatred, power-lust.” Faced with such irreconcilable opposites, each audience member must confront the question: Which side do I believe?

December 14-16: A Christmas Pudding, by David Birney
An Ignite favorite, this play directed by Paul Baldwin is a compilation of well known stories, Christmas carols, and a few unknown or lesser-known pieces woven together. “A Christmas Pudding…touches old feelings that speak to the real spirit of Christmas…a Dickensian Pudding in the great tradition of surprise and transformation that touches the great spirit…of the Season…wonderful” – Los Angeles Times

March 15-17: King Lear by William Shakespeare
Join us for one of the Bard’s great tragedies, directed by Brian Cheney. Lear, the aging King of Britain, determines to split his domain evenly between his three daughter in proportion to their love for him. Unfortunately, he misjudges the sincerity of their affection and banishes the one who truly reveres him. Through tricks and lies, Lear is transformed from a powerful king to a mad man.